George V. Higgins retrospective
Posted: 11 November 2007 09:49 AM   [ Ignore ]
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There’s an interesting retrospective on George V. Higgins here.

One of the things it says is: “As is often the case with so called “hard-boiled” writers, Higgins’ literary reputation and popularity was stronger in Britain than in American,  said USC English professor Dr.  Matthew Bruccoli.”

So, is Elmore Leonard the first American to be appreciated in America first?

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Posted: 11 November 2007 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Elmore Leonard’s introduction to The Friends of Eddie Coyle by George V. Higgins

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Posted: 12 November 2007 02:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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EL won the Edgar Allen Poe Award for La Brava (& attracted the attention of Stephen King), whereas in the UK he only started attracting hipsters’ attention with Glitz.. But perhaps many EAP Award winners continue to be considered ‘only’ genre writers in the US. Given the date, though, the appreciation of King would seem to be serious enough.

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Posted: 14 November 2007 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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From Johnny Mac’s link.  Sound familiar?

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Related to the canard about George’s over-production is the misapprehension about his technique: the construction of character and narrative through speech. Lazy critics who regarded George’s reliance on speech as a form of authorial self-indulgence did not understand that his characters’ speech is always under his control: “I write dialogue in order to make something from it—a story.” The Higgins narrative technique concealed the author. Speech is character is action. George explicated this process in a 1987 interview:

A Matter of Crime: You have said that the structural use of speech in your novels is intended to replace the omniscient author with the omniscient reader. Would you expand on that?

Higgins: I don’t know how my stories are going to come out. I build them the way I used to build a trial, a criminal trial. The witnesses come along, and each recites what portion of reality he knows about: what he happened to observe, what he happened to do, what he happened to hear. I don’t change their testimony, as it were. At the end of a book, or at the end of a trial, either one, you then call upon the jury to reach its own moral decision, its own ethical judgments about the way the characters have behaved. I don’t do that for them. I give them all the evidence I know about, all the evidence I’ve “heard” or “seen” and present it on the page and let the reader decide what the morality was. I don’t want to make any judgments for the reader. That’s the reader’s job. I think reading is a participatory sport.

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Posted: 19 November 2007 10:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I was at the Higgins Retrospective when it opened a year ago.  I was taking notes for an Elmore Leonard symposium we want to put together in the next couple of years.  Hung out with Loretta Higgins and the esteemed Literature scholar, Matthew Bruccoli who would like to see Elmore’s papers at the Cooper Library down there in Columbia, South Carolina.  Professor Bruccoli just sent me a copy of a book he edited on the unpublished stories of George V. Higgins.  I would like to publish a similar volume someday of Elmore’s unpublished material.

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Posted: 26 November 2007 11:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Gregg Sutter - 19 November 2007 03:12 PM

Matthew Bruccoli…would like to see Elmore’s papers at the Cooper Library down there in Columbia, South Carolina.

 
What does Elmore think about that?  Is he down?  If there’s no logical place for them in Detroit or Hollywood, USC would be a fine choice, right there next to the Higgins collection.

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Posted: 30 November 2007 06:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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What does Elmore think about that?  Is he down?  If there’s no logical place for them in Detroit or Hollywood, USC would be a fine choice, right there next to the Higgins collection.

Some of Elmore’s early papers are on loan to the University of Detroit Mercy.  They are probably not equipped for the whole collection.  The decision on where to put one’s papers is a complex one. We have been thinking about it for years.  There are only a few institutions worth considering.  The Thomas Cooper Library at the University of South Carolina is one of them.

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Posted: 01 December 2007 08:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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How about my house? I’ll make room.

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Posted: 01 December 2007 09:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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I’m definitely with the Counsellor on this one. I think the idea should be to make them as difficult as possible to find for all those academic types who’ll be trying to create another literary industry.

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Posted: 01 December 2007 01:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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yeah, maybe they could go upstairs at Sportree’s.

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Posted: 10 November 2008 07:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Gregg Sutter - 19 November 2007 03:12 PM

I was at the Higgins Retrospective when it opened a year ago.  I was taking notes for an Elmore Leonard symposium we want to put together in the next couple of years.  Hung out with Loretta Higgins and the esteemed Literature scholar, Matthew Bruccoli who would like to see Elmore’s papers at the Cooper Library down there in Columbia, South Carolina.  Professor Bruccoli just sent me a copy of a book he edited on the unpublished stories of George V. Higgins.  I would like to publish a similar volume someday of Elmore’s unpublished material.

Anything going on with this symposium idea, Gregg?

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Posted: 12 November 2008 11:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Yeah, it would be good to hear if there’s any progress.

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